Date Approved

5-7-2004

Embargo Period

4-21-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in Mental Health Counseling

Department

Psychology

College

College of Science & Mathematics

First Advisor

Pérez-Rivera, Katherine

Subject(s)

Anger; Race

Disciplines

Psychology

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the racial identity attitudes of African-Americans and experience and expression of anger. For several decades, theories of racial identity development have been postulated (e.g. Cross, 1971; Helms, 1990). Affective correlates of differing statuses of racial identity development have been hypothesized and widely studied. However, the affect of anger has not been given much systematic attention in the literature, though theoretical models of racial identity development do include assumptions of the role of anger. Specifically, in Helms' model of racial identity development (1990), which this thesis adheres to, anger is theorized to be an affective correlate of both the encounter status and the immersion-emersion status. Inferences into the experience and expression of anger at all stages of racial identity development were tested in this thesis. In this study 22 African-American females were administered a number of surveys to measure racial identity attitudes and anger experience and expression. The results of this study did not indicate a relationship between racial identity attitudes and the experience and expression of anger. However, a number of limitations to this study were discussed.

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Psychology Commons

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