Date Approved

5-4-2004

Embargo Period

4-26-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in School Psychology

Department

Educational Services and Leadership

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Klanderman, John

Second Advisor

Dihoff, Roberta

Subject(s)

Rowan University--Students; Children of divorced parents--Education (Higher); Student adjustment

Disciplines

Educational Psychology

Abstract

Children of divorce and children of intact families grow up in very different worlds. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects that being a child of divorce has on later adjustment in college. A sample of 95 undergraduate students were administered the Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire. Of the 95 students, 18 reported being from divorced families, two reported parental death, and 75 reported their parents still being married. Results indicated that the age a child experiences their parents divorce can have a significant impact on their later attachment to college and social adjustment to college. More specifically, the younger a child was when they experienced their parents' divorce the less attachment to college they reported. Also, children who experienced their parents' divorce before the age of four reported higher social adjustment to college than students who reported experiencing their parents' divorce at age four or older. No significant differences between children of divorce and children of intact families were found on all measures of the Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire.

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