Date Approved

8-20-2003

Embargo Period

5-2-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in Applied Psychology and Mental Health Counseling

Department

Psychology

College

College of Science & Mathematics

First Advisor

Haugh, James A.

Subject(s)

Eating disorders

Disciplines

Psychology

Abstract

The purpose of the current study was to explore the cross-sectional relationship between personality, interpersonal problems, coping, and eating disorder symptomology. Participants were undergraduate students at a public university. Results indicated that personality was the strongest predictor of risk factors associated with eating disorders. Neuroticism was the strongest predictor, followed by conscientiousness, extraversion, and agreeableness. Interpersonal and coping factors significantly predicted only four risk factors associated with eating disorders. Specifically, interpersonal problems related to being cold/distant, socially inhibited, and self-sacrificing, and the coping factors of emotional social support, acceptance, denial, and instrumental social support were all significant predictors. Implications for future research exploring the etiology, prevention, and treatment of eating disorders are discussed.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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