Date Approved

5-6-2003

Embargo Period

5-10-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in School Psychology

Department

Educational Services and Leadership

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Klanderman, John

Second Advisor

Dihoff, Roberta

Subject(s)

Skating; Women skaters

Disciplines

Educational Psychology

Abstract

The present study explored motivational orientation of 12 females (age 9 - 18) who participated in figure skating. The hypothesis used was that competitive skaters, with more demands on their time and finances, would more often exhibit an avoidance of failure motivation when participating in sport. This hypothesis was chosen to address the high burnout rates that are exhibited by child athletes at the elite level.

To determine the results of the study, skaters were administered the Achievement Motivations Scale for Sporting Environments developed by Brent Rushall and Randy Fox in 2000. The scale asked 28 questions to which four response alternatives were provided. These were: always, frequently, sometimes or never. The scores that were generated indicated whether the respondent had a Motivation for Success orientation or a Motivation to Avoid Failure orientation.

To analyze the results of the survey, a Pearson's Correlation was employed. The results determined that there was not a statistical significance between the motivation of the skaters and the amount of time skated per week. It was also concluded that the mean scores for Motivation for Success and Motivation to Avoid Failure indicated that most of these skaters continue participating with a motive to achieve success.

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