Date Approved

5-13-2003

Embargo Period

5-10-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in School Administration

Department

Educational Services and Leadership

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Kern, Robert

Subject(s)

Charles W. Lewis Middle School (Blackwood, N.J.); Multiculturalism

Disciplines

Elementary and Middle and Secondary Education Administration

Abstract

As America becomes more and more diverse, public schools are forced to adapt to the changing faces in education. The purpose of this study was to promote culturally responsive teaching and analyze programs that impact non-Asian minority students in a suburban school district. The intern used observations, surveys, and interviews to study programs at the Charles W. Lewis Middle School in Blackwood, New Jersey. The research began by examining the school's culture and then went on to form committees and groups to promote diversity throughout the building. During this research, the intern determined that non-Asian minority students were disproportionately represented in special education, regular education, and gifted programs. White students were also afforded more opportunities for academic success than minority students. Through culturally responsive teaching, special programs were established to boost self-esteem, promote diversity, and increase academic performance among minority students.

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