Date Approved

12-20-2002

Embargo Period

5-12-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in Applied Psychology

Department

Psychology

College

College of Science & Mathematics

First Advisor

Cahill, Janet

Second Advisor

Haugh, James A.

Subject(s)

Anxiety; Behavior therapy; Depression, Mental--Case studies

Disciplines

Psychology

Abstract

This case study evaluates the effectiveness of supportive-expressive therapy combined with aspects of cognitive-behavioral therapy in the treatment of an adult female who has breast cancer and is diagnosed with comorbid Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder. The subject had many psychosocial stressors. The subject voluntarily participated in outpatient individual psychotherapy received in a private counseling facility based on the twelve-step model of Alcoholics Anonymous. She completed various formal assessments of anxiety and depression periodically during the course of treatment, as well as a satisfaction survey following the termination of treatment. The literature review, which explored empirically supported treatments and pharmacological considerations, revealed that assessing styles of anxiety-coping can help in the selection of effective treatment approaches, and that comorbidity generally requires longer treatment. Pharmacotherapy effects and the need for counselor-physician cooperation are described. An overview of the subject's progress is included. Outcome measures were completed, indicating that anxiety and depressive symptoms diminished over the course of treatment. Finally, suggestions for improving treatment are made for future clients who have similar diagnoses.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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