Date Approved

5-10-2016

Embargo Period

5-12-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. School Psychology

Department

Psychology

College

College of Science & Mathematics

First Advisor

Dihoff, Roberta

Subject(s)

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder; Sex differences

Disciplines

Child Psychology

Abstract

There is a great disparity in the amount of males diagnosed with ADHD compared to females. This paper reviews a large collection of literature ranging from the history of the disorder, neurological studies, potential genetic differences between genders, as well as potential gender biases. These topics are all examined with the purpose of trying to determine which effect, if any, they may have had in creating the criteria necessary for a diagnosis and how that relates to each gender. The study examined each individual symptom necessary for an ADHD diagnosis and asked teachers to complete a survey designed to attempt to associate that symptom with a specific gender. Teachers were specifically chosen due to their involvement in the diagnosis of school aged children as they are often required to fill out ADHD rating scales. Data was analyzed in SPSS 23 using a Repeated Measures One-Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The study revealed that there was a significant (p<=.0001) association of the male gender with the symptoms required for an ADHD diagnosis.

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