Author(s)

Mark Roman

Date Approved

7-13-2011

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. School Psychology-Professional School Psychology

Department

Educational Services, Administration, and Higher Education

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Klanderman, John

Subject(s)

Conformity

Disciplines

Child Psychology | Student Counseling and Personnel Services

Abstract

Solomon Asch conducted a Line Judgment Task in the 1950s that led researchers to believe that conformity can be assessed through experimentation. The purpose of this study was to modify that of Asch's experiment and to assess the answers that college undergraduate students would give. Twelve trials of line comparison tasks were utilized as well as answers from five confederates. It was hypothesized that out of the 47 participants, more of them would answer incorrectly to the incorrectly answered trials of the confederates than those to those trials that the confederates answered correctly. There were a total of five incorrect trials and seven correct trials that confederates answered correctly. This study does lend support to the notion of conformity based on answers of confederates; there was a higher percentage incorrect for the incorrect trials than compared to the correct trials. The reasoning and explanation of these results are discussed.

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