Date Approved

6-13-2016

Embargo Period

6-14-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. Special Education

Department

Interdisciplinary and Inclusive Education

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Kuder, Sydney

Subject(s)

Self-monitoring; Students with disabilities

Disciplines

Special Education and Teaching

Abstract

This study sought out answers to the questions: Are students who are taught self-management skills better able to monitor their own learning then students who are not taught the skill? Does the use of self-monitoring applications improve a student’s chance of becoming a better self-monitor? Do high or low-tech strategies help students manage their learning and behavior the best?

For this study three seventh grade students were observed. Two of the students were observed in a self-contained English Language Arts class while the last was in an inclusive English Language Arts class. Each student had varying disabilities that affected his or her learning and or behavior. Each student was observed for one week to identify what skills he or she needed assistance with self-monitoring. After the skills were identified, each student was taught three strategies with one week in between. The first strategy was a low tech strategy, the second was a combination high and low tech strategy, and the third was a strictly high tech strategy. Throughout the process the students were observed by the teacher as well as self accessing their progress in each task.

After doing the research it is clear that students who are taught self-monitoring skills are better self-managers. Each participant made strides in their self-management but not all of the techniques worked for every student. Students with disabilities such as ADHD and ADD struggled with high tech techniques while students with anxiety found those strategies helpful. It was also interesting to note that not every child was able to correctly identify his or her ability to self-monitor. These techniques will hopefully help the students the rest of their lives. Teaching these strategies to students will help them make progress in accessing their own learning. Teachers just need to find what strategy works best for his or her students.

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