Date Approved

7-28-2016

Embargo Period

7-28-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. Higher Education

Department

Educational Services and Leadership

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Sisco, Burton R.

Second Advisor

Walpole, Marybeth

Subject(s)

Engagement (Philosophy); College Students; Motivation in Education

Disciplines

Higher Education

Abstract

This thesis explores the desirable limits of Astin’s Involvement Theory. Astin (1993) reports that involvement on campus is positively related to student success, however, in other portions of his work, he reports that there are certain limitations on the theory of involvement. The purpose of this study was to investigate the involvement patterns and academic impact of highly involved students at Rowan University, in Glassboro, New Jersey in the spring 2015 semester. The target population for this survey was current Resident Assistants, Orientation Staff, and members of the Student Government Association. The instrument to assess students’ patterns and levels of involvement at Rowan University was adapted from a survey of involvement used by Ohio University. An overall look at the responses concerning student involvement patterns and suggested a range of activities. In addition, more than 86% of subjects reported high GPAs indicating little statistical connection between GPA and involvement on campus. Moreover, students were very involved in both academic and social activities. They reported a high level of satisfaction and importance with their social involvement academic involvement, campus atmosphere, and personal goal achievement.

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