Date Approved

12-7-1999

Embargo Period

8-2-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in Applied Psychology

Department

Psychology

College

College of Science & Mathematics

First Advisor

Jeffrey, Linda

Subject(s)

Bullying

Disciplines

Psychology

Abstract

The focus of this thesis is to determine the extent of bullying behavior in a southern New Jersey school as measured by an adapted version of the Olweus Bully Questionnaire. Four hundred seventy-two fifth, sixth, seventh, and eighth grade middle school students were surveyed regarding bullying behavior in their school. The obtained percentages indicate an increase in the trends found by previous research.

Recently, there has been a shift in bullying research from a dyadic focus on the characteristics of the Bully and the Victim to the recognition of bullying as a whole group process, with the majority of children playing some kind of role. Five main categories were identified in order to reliably distinguish the varying roles children play during a bullying incident. These categories included; the Bully, the Victim, Assistant (Bully), Defender (Victim), and the Outsider (passive observer). Results indicate that 17.2% of the students have an active role during a bullying incident. In addition, 44.5% of the students self-identified as passive observers.

Future progress in the measurement of school bullying, and the advancement and success of prevention and intervention strategies will depend on making clearer distinctions between the varying roles children play during bullying incidents. School-wide intervention programs are reviewed.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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