Date Approved

4-16-1999

Embargo Period

8-2-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in School Administration

Department

Educational Services and Leadership

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Johnson, Theodore

Subject(s)

African American boys; African American high school students; Suburban schools

Disciplines

Elementary and Middle and Secondary Education Administration

Abstract

This study investigated the academic and social status of the African American male adolescent in a suburban upper middle class school district and compared the findings with the literature at large. Since most of the literature dealing with the African American male adolescent is conducted in an urban setting, the intent of this investigation was to determine if the same problems that confront today's African American male adolescent in urban centers are prevalent in suburbia. Research was a combination of quantitative and qualitative investigation. The quantitative research compared discipline referrals, grade point average, classification, demographics and referrals to the Pupil Assistance Committee with the findings in the literature. Qualitative research involved interviewing 10th, 11th, and 12th grade African American male adolescents. Interviews dealt with importance of the family and peer group, unrealistic expectations of the future, perception of academic performance, perceived treatment by teachers and classmates, and involvement in extra-curricular activities. Results were then compared with the literature.

A strong positive correlation was found in all areas of the investigation with the exception of the importance of the peer group. The study suggests that the same problems that confront today's African American adolescent in our urban centers are prevalent in suburbia.

Share

COinS