Date Approved

5-5-1998

Embargo Period

8-10-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in School Psychology

Department

Educational Services and Leadership

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Klanderman, John

Second Advisor

Dihoff, Roberta

Subject(s)

Academic achievement; High school athletes

Disciplines

Educational Psychology

Abstract

This study was undertaken to measure and compare the academic success of student athletes and non-student athletes. The suggested hypothesis was that student athletes would perform better academically because of factors relating to accomplished goal setting and discipline. This study implies that student athletes are more prepared for academic success because of their goal oriented behaviors.

206 students participated in the experiment. There were 141 athletes and 65 non athletes. Those who were described as an athlete were a participating member of a varsity sport. The students were all members of a local Catholic high school. With the permission of the school, the researcher was presented with a listing of each student which revealed their G.P.A. score and the participatory status as an athlete or non-athlete.

A descriptive analysis was performed in order to indicate the percentage ranking of both groups of subjects within specified G.P.A. ranges. The results of the analysis indicated that non-athletes outperformed athletes academically within the highest G.P.A. ranges. It was concluded that considering these results, the hypothesis predicting student athletes' academic success would be superior to that of non-student athletes would be rejected.

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