Date Approved

5-1-1998

Embargo Period

8-12-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in School Psychology

Department

Educational Services and Leadership

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Dihoff, Roberta

Subject(s)

Inclusive education; Special education teachers--Attitudes

Disciplines

Educational Psychology

Abstract

Whether or not the attitudes toward inclusion differ between regular educators and special educators was investigated. From the current literature reviewed, it was hypothesized that special educators would have a more favorable attitude toward inclusion than regular educators. Forty-nine regular educators and sixty-three special educators responded to a questionnaire. The results of an independent groups t test did confirm a statistically significant difference between the two groups. However, the significant difference revealed that, overall, regular educators had a more favorable attitude toward inclusion than special educators.

Over half of the regular educators believed that the challenge of a regular class promotes the academic growth of a handicapped student, while over half of the special educators disagreed. In addition, over half of the special educators believed that the extra attention handicapped students require is detrimental to other students, the behavior of special-needs students will set a bad example for others, handicapped children will exhibit behavior problems in the regular classroom, and special-needs students are socially isolated by regular-classroom students. Over half of the regular educators disagreed with these same statements.

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