Date Approved

5-7-1998

Embargo Period

8-12-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in School Psychology

Department

Educational Services and Leadership

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Dihoff, Roberta

Second Advisor

Klanderman, John

Subject(s)

Peer counseling of students

Disciplines

Educational Psychology

Abstract

This thesis is a preliminary study of the qualities of people who chose to be peer helpers. A review of the literature on helping theories led to the conclusion that empathy and self-acceptance were necessary elements of a helper. This study hoped to lend support to this theory. The hypothesis stated that students electing to take a peer helping training course would have different levels of empathy and self-acceptance than those in a cooking class. These qualities were measured using a psychological inventory, and the scores of 115 adolescent subjects (n=115) were compared. There was no significant difference between students choosing different electives. Implications of these findings are discussed, as well as formats for future studies.

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