Date Approved

5-31-1996

Embargo Period

9-4-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in Mathematics Education

Department

Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math Education

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Sooy, John

Subject(s)

Diaries--Authorship; Mathematics--Study and teaching (Secondary)

Disciplines

Science and Mathematics Education

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a significant difference in the level of academic achievement in responding to open-ended questions between those students who wrote in journals and those who did not write in journals, in an Integrated Mathematics I class.

The sample consisted of thirty-three students from two Integrated Mathematics I classes; there were eighteen students who wrote in journals (the experimental group) and fifteen students who did not write in journals (the control group.) Integrated Mathematics I is a course designed for ninth grade non-college-bound students, where emphasis is placed on skills necessary for successful completion of the New Jersey High School Proficiency Test. Achievement tests containing open-ended questions were administered to both groups prior to and following the experiment. An independent t-test was performed to see if there was any significant difference in the level of academic achievement in responding to open-ended questions.

The study indicated that there was no significant difference in academic achievement between those students who wrote in journals and those who did not write in journals.

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