Date Approved

3-23-2017

Embargo Period

3-23-2017

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

MA School Psychology

Department

Educational Services and Leadership

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Allen, Terri

Second Advisor

Dihoff, Roberta

Subject(s)

Learning disabled--Education (Higher)--United States

Disciplines

Disability and Equity in Education | School Psychology

Abstract

An increasing number of students with learning disabilities are enrolled in college and seek support services under ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act). According to U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (2015), Digest of Education Statistics, 2013 (2015-011), approximately 11% of students report having a disability. However, although more students attending post-secondary education are receiving accommodations and supports, the retention of these students remains a central concern. A student's ability to self-advocate seems to be one key to academic success. Self-determination and self-efficacy factors are frequently cited as essential to successful transition to college. The current study explored the relationship of locus of control, parental involvement, and student openness with regard to their disability. The results illustrated that in regards to the participant's perception of their disability, there was no significant difference between the students who reported an external locus of control versus the students who reported an internal locus of control.

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