Date Approved

6-5-2017

Embargo Period

6-5-2017

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

MA School Psychology

Department

Educational Services and Leadership

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Callueng, Carmelo

Second Advisor

Dihoff, Roberta

Third Advisor

Bole Williams, Barbara

Subject(s)

Stress in adolescence; Mindfulness (Psychology)

Disciplines

Higher Education | School Psychology

Abstract

College students who have high levels of stress have reported difficulties with functioning on a daily basis, whether it be high anxiety due to classes or an increase in unhealthy habits like smoking or overeating. Studies have shown that those who practice mindfulness every day learn how to live with accepting the stresses in their lives (Siegel & Allison, 2016). This study explored the relationship between mindfulness and stress in college students from a medium size public university in the northeast. Two self-report measures were used to collect data though an online survey. Data were subjected to descriptive and inferential statistical analysis. Results indicated that students rated themselves relatively high in the Observing and Describing facets of mindfulness. Students overall stress was at the moderate level. Lastly, students' ratings of mindfulness and stress were negatively correlated. Hence, the hypothesis that mindfulness and stress are inversely correlated was verified in this study.

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