Date Approved

6-24-2014

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. Applied Psychology and Professional Mental Health Counseling

Department

Psychology

College

College of Science & Mathematics

First Advisor

Kerwin, Mary Louise

Subject(s)

Finance, Personal;Mentally ill

Disciplines

Psychiatric and Mental Health

Abstract

Five men diagnosed with Severe and Persistent Mental Illness (SPMI) were recruited from a partial care program to participate in a study on the efficacy of teaching money management skills. The participants were also assessed on perceived stress, financial strain, and symptomology. The men were randomly assigned to either an experimental group or a waitlist control group; both groups received an intervention for money management consisting of a workshop on budgeting and weekly coaching based on expenses. Participants in the experimental group received the money management class immediately after a pretest baseline was established and the wait-list control group received the intervention three weeks later. No significant findings emerged; however, trends revealed improvement in budgeting skills and a reduction in perceived stress.

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