Author(s)

Gabriela Lopez

Date Approved

10-2-2015

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. Clinical Mental Health Counseling

Department

Psychology

College

College of Science & Mathematics

First Advisor

Haugh, Jim

Subject(s)

Depression, Mental;Anxiety

Disciplines

Psychiatric and Mental Health

Abstract

Depression and anxiety continue to be prevalent concerns, with lifetime prevalence rates of 41% for depressive symptoms and 15% for anxious symptoms. Reputable studies confirm that high self-reported mindful awareness and social problem solving are both individually related to a lower severity of self-reported depressive symptoms. Rumination has also been found to have a significant relationship with depressive and anxious symptoms. Yet, these etiological factors have not been studied in combination, which is the focus of the current study. Hypothesis 1: Mindfulness, rumination, and social problem-solving will predict depressive symptoms after controlling for the variance predicted by Time 1 (T1) depressive symptoms. Hypothesis 2: Mindfulness, rumination, and social problem-solving will predict depressive symptoms after controlling for the variance predicted by Time 1 (T1) depressive symptoms. Hypothesis 3: Mindfulness, rumination, and social problem-solving will predict anxious symptoms after controlling for the variance predicted by T1 anxious symptoms. Analysis included two separate hierarchical linear regressions to evaluate how these predictor factors influence the criterion variables of interest. Based on the correlations examined, there are significant relationships between mindfulness, rumination and SPS and depressive and anxious symptoms. However, these variables did not significantly predict depressive and anxious symptoms prospectively after controlling for symptoms reported at T1.

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