Author(s)

Jennifer Ellis

Date Approved

8-8-2012

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. Special Education

Department

Special Educational Services/Instruction

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Xin, Joy

Subject(s)

Arithmetic--Study and teaching;Computer-assisted instruction;Self-monitoring

Disciplines

Special Education and Teaching

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not the use of technology would increase automaticity of basic subtraction facts with "at risk" students and whether or not self-monitoring would motivate "at risk" students to improve their math scores to achieve automaticity of basic subtraction facts. Participants included four "at-risk" second graders from an elementary school in a small suburban community in southern New Jersey. The study took place over 11 weeks and was conducted by the classroom teacher. The first week consisted of collecting baseline data followed by five weeks of students using the Everyday Mathematics online Facts Workshop Game and five weeks of students self-monitoring their progress. A multiple baseline single subject design with A B C phases was used. All four students had an increase in automaticity of basic subtraction facts. Findings indicate that both interventions are effective in improving math scores to achieve automaticity of basic math facts.

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