Author(s)

Francine Sandone

Date Approved

6-17-2015

Embargo Period

12-14-2015

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. School Psychology-Professional School Psychology

Department

Psychology

College

College of Science & Mathematics

First Advisor

Dihoff, Roberta

Subject(s)

College environment--United States

Disciplines

Higher Education | Student Counseling and Personnel Services

Abstract

Linked to positive student outcomes such as effective risk prevention and health promotion, decreased problem behavior, and increased likelihood for academic success, climate has become a buzzword in not only elementary and secondary education, but in higher education as well. Colleges and universities have followed the precedent of school climate research and have begun to explore and unveil characteristics that impact campus climate. However, previous research has been limited in not only the identity characteristics they assess, but also in the degree of comprehensive assessment for this complex concept. The purpose of this study was to investigate multiple dimensions of student perceptions of campus climate at Rowan University. Specifically, the primary purpose of this study was to assess if resident status, an identity characteristic previously overlooked in previous climate research, had a significant effect on campus climate scores. A mixed method, anonymous survey design was utilized and distributed online using the Rowan Subject Pool. Bivariate correlation tests were ran to identify any significant relationships using SPSS for Windows.

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