Date Approved

6-26-2009

Embargo Period

3-16-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in Mental Health Counseling and Applied Psychology

Department

Psychology

College

College of Science & Mathematics

First Advisor

Haugh, Jim A.

Subject(s)

Body image in women; Eating disorders in women

Disciplines

Psychiatry and Psychology

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between eating disorder symptomology, body image concerns, and early maladaptive schemas. The specific eating disorder symptoms were binging, purging and restricting. Participants were undergraduate college women. Eating disorder symptomology was measured along a continuum so that the sample encompassed individuals with eating disorder pathology ranging from asymptomatic to severe symptoms. Multiple regression analyses indicated that body image concerns predicted a significant proportion of variance in binging, purging and restrictive behaviors. Specifically, shape concerns predicted significant unique variance in restrictive behaviors. Early maladaptive schemas were found to account for a significant proportion of variance among restrictive behaviors only. Specific early maladaptive schemas that accounted for significant unique variance included unrelenting standards and admiration seeking. Findings offer continued support for the importance of body image concerns in the development and maintenance of eating disorder symptomology. In contrast, findings suggest that the relationship between early maladaptive schemas and eating disorder symptomology is less clear and may only be significant to restrictive behaviors.

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