Date Approved

5-22-2009

Embargo Period

3-18-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in Mental Health Counseling and Applied Psychology

Department

Psychology

College

College of Science & Mathematics

First Advisor

Angelone, DJ

Subject(s)

Male rape; Rape victims--Counseling of

Disciplines

Psychology

Abstract

The present study evaluated the psychosocial effects of rape on heterosexual and homosexual men. It was hypothesized that 1) non-closeted homosexual men would have less symptomology and more resilience than closeted homosexual men and heterosexual men; 2) the more protective factors a man had, the less symptomology he would display and the more likely he would exhibit posttraumatic growth; 3) there would be an interaction between sexual orientation of the perpetrator and sexual orientation of the victim on symptomology. One-way ANOVAs revealed that homosexual men and bisexual men reported significantly less PTSD symptomology than heterosexual men. Further, homosexual men endorsed more male rape myths than heterosexual men. A univariate-ANOVA revealed a significant interaction between victim orientation and perpetrator orientation on depression. Clinical implications and social issues surrounding male rape are reviewed.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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