Date Approved

5-13-2009

Embargo Period

3-18-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in Mental Health Counseling and Applied Psychology

Department

Psychology

College

College of Science & Mathematics

First Advisor

Kerwin, Mary Louise E.

Subject(s)

Menstrual cycle--Psychological aspects; Precocious puberty

Disciplines

Psychology

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of early onset of menstruation and biological father absence on depression in females. Participants (n=46) were asked to complete a demographic questionnaire and a series of psychometric assessments. It was hypothesized that females who reached puberty earlier than their peers as well as females growing up in a one-parent household, with the biological father absent, would experience more depressive symptoms than females who reached puberty later than their peers or were being raised in two-parent households. Statistical analyses revealed early maturing females reported higher levels of depressive symptoms than on-time and late maturing females. Early-maturing females who were raised in one-parent households demonstrated higher levels of depressive symptoms than early-maturing females who were raised in two-parent households. Early maturing females in one-parent households also reported lower levels of perceived cohesiveness between family members. Implications for developing early intervention techniques for females at risk for developing Major Depressive Disorder are discussed.

Included in

Psychology Commons

Share

COinS