Date Approved

5-11-2008

Embargo Period

3-21-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in School Psychology

Department

Educational Services and Leadership

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Epifanio, Frank

Second Advisor

Dihoff, Roberta

Subject(s)

Graduate students--Psychology; Procrastination

Disciplines

Educational Psychology

Abstract

While not completely understood, the issue of procrastination is well known to the education field, and has been shown to be a significant problem affecting the academic achievement of college students. Research has examined the effects of procrastination across a variety of populations. However, research in the area of procrastination in relation to outcomes in graduate students compared to undergraduate students is lacking. Similarly, there is conflicting evidence as to whether academic procrastination results in lower grade point averages in college students, or whether differences exist in relation to gender and procrastination. Further, research is limited in the area of cognitive and affective factors in relation to procrastination. To investigate these areas, 74 participants (25 males and 49 females) enrolled at Rowan University participated in the study. Participants completed a confidential demographic information sheet, the Procrastination Assessment Scale-Students (PASS), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale (TMAS), and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D).

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