Date Approved

5-7-2007

Embargo Period

3-24-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in Mental Health Counseling and Applied Psychology

Department

Psychology

College

College of Science & Mathematics

First Advisor

Kerwin, Mary Lou

Subject(s)

Drug testing; High school students--Drug testing

Disciplines

Psychology

Abstract

The purpose of this exploratory investigation was to ascertain the effectiveness of decreasing drug use in a high school setting by implementing a random student drug-testing program. High school students who were involved in any athletic or extracurricular activities or who were applying for a parking permit in one local school were required to obtain parental permission to participate in a random student drug-testing program. Approximately once a month, an outside agency performed confidential and private urinalysis screening at the high school on 10-14 students whose names were chosen randomly using a computer program. If a urine test was positive for any drug, the contracted company's physician reviewed the results of the finding and notified the parents of the results. Outcome variables were students' anonymous responses on the American Drug and Alcohol Survey, which was administered yearly. The introduction of the random student drug-testing program was associated with decreased self-report use of drugs and alcohol within the first year of implementation. Increased self-reported drug and alcohol usage was observed within each cohort of students as they progressed to the next grade level. Implications for high school policy for random student drug-testing are discussed.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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