Date Approved

4-19-2007

Embargo Period

3-24-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in Higher Education Administration

Department

Educational Services and Leadership

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Sisco, Burton

Subject(s)

Academic achievement--New Jersey; College students--New Jersey--Attitudes

Disciplines

Higher Education Administration

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitudes of selected African-American male college students and the impact of financing, role-modeling, high school preparation, college/community acceptance, and family support on academic achievement at Rowan University. The study sought to determine if any of these factors had a significant relationship with academic achievement.

Academic achievement was measured by a self-reported GPA of 2.76 or higher, which was higher than Rowan University's minimum requirement (2.5) for graduation, and honors achievements (awards, certificates, honor societies). Responses were measured using a Likert scale of 1-Strongly Agree to 5-Strongly Disagree.

Respondents reported that financial aid (69%), college/community acceptance (63%), role-modeling (78%), family support (92%), and high school preparation (51%) influenced them most. Respondents who reported a GPA of 2.76 or higher also reported that financial aid (63%), college/community acceptance (63%), role-modeling (61%), family support (60%), and high school preparation (59%) influenced most. According to the mean response rate, respondents who reported a GPA of 2.76 or higher recognize the influence of family support (60%) and role-modeling (61%) as having the greatest impact on academic achievement. There was a significant relationship between the statement "I feel well prepared to take college courses" and academic achievement.

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