Date of Presentation

4-17-2020

College

College of Science & Mathematics

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Kathryn Mickle, Thomas Jefferson University, Courtney E. Richmond, Rowan University, Nathan Ruhl, Rowan University

Poster Abstract

The study involves the collection of zooplankton samples from Whitesbog, which is an inactive cranberry bog complex that is used as water storage for cranberry harvest during the fall season. Whitesbog is novel because very little human activity occurs in the surrounding area that could degrade water quality, but the complex itself is not natural. The water found in the upstream parts of the bog is highly acidic, which likely creates a gradient of ecological dystrophy in the zooplankton community. In this study, we investigate patterns of density and biodiversity across the complex and question whether these patterns are driven by physical-chemical conditions. Zooplankton density for different species varies between sites, with some sites changing more than others over time. Water temperature was the best predictor of zooplankton density, but it is unclear with present data whether this is a non-linear or linear response gradient. Turbidity and water temperature are the best predictors of zooplankton biodiversity, but the environmental variables we measured were insufficient to explain much of the observed differences between sites. Further testing is needed.

Student Keywords

Zooplankton Biodiversity, Novel Water Storage Complex, New Jersey Pinelands

Disciplines

Biology

DOI

10.31986/issn.2689-0690_rdw.buss.1000

Included in

Biology Commons

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Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Zooplankton Biodiversity Patterns Across a Novel Water Storage Complex in the NJ Pinelands

The study involves the collection of zooplankton samples from Whitesbog, which is an inactive cranberry bog complex that is used as water storage for cranberry harvest during the fall season. Whitesbog is novel because very little human activity occurs in the surrounding area that could degrade water quality, but the complex itself is not natural. The water found in the upstream parts of the bog is highly acidic, which likely creates a gradient of ecological dystrophy in the zooplankton community. In this study, we investigate patterns of density and biodiversity across the complex and question whether these patterns are driven by physical-chemical conditions. Zooplankton density for different species varies between sites, with some sites changing more than others over time. Water temperature was the best predictor of zooplankton density, but it is unclear with present data whether this is a non-linear or linear response gradient. Turbidity and water temperature are the best predictors of zooplankton biodiversity, but the environmental variables we measured were insufficient to explain much of the observed differences between sites. Further testing is needed.