Date Approved

6-29-2018

Embargo Period

7-2-2018

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

MA Clinical Mental Health Counseling

Department

Psychology

College

College of Science & Mathematics

First Advisor

Dinzeo, Thomas J.

Second Advisor

Evans-Chase, Michelle

Subject(s)

Delusions

Disciplines

Clinical Psychology | Psychology

Abstract

Our beliefs profoundly influence how we interact and understand the experiences we have and the world around us. However, some individuals may develop 'false' beliefs (i.e., delusions) that are not grounded in consensual reality that may create adversities for the individual or others. Although various theories have been developed relating to the formation and maintenance of delusions, explaining their origins, meanings, and precise influence is a difficult task due to the highly individualistic nature of beliefs. The current study examined a number of likely candidate processes suspected of contributing to the formation and maintenance of delusional ideation in a sub-clinical sample of 200 undergraduate students. Overall, mixed support for our hypotheses were found. As expected, sub-clinical schizophrenia-spectrum symptomology were highly correlated. Additionally, delusional ideation was predicted by cognitive and mood facets, and normative beliefs such as spirituality. Expansive delusions in particular were predictive of self-esteem, sense of purpose, and approaching significance with positive affect, highlighting potential positive influences of delusional ideation. Certain elements of cognitive processes, symptomology, emotional, and contextual factors may interact with an individual's self-view, which in turn may influence the content of specific types of delusional ideation, perhaps leading to the formation and maintenance of such beliefs.

Share

COinS