Date Approved

6-2-2010

Embargo Period

10-28-2020

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. Psychology

Department

Psychology

College

College of Science & Mathematics

First Advisor

Haugh, Jim A.

Subject(s)

Depression, Mental

Disciplines

Clinical Psychology

Abstract

This thesis explored the relationship between childhood adversity and depression course, and the influence of Early Maladaptive Schemas (EMS) and coping on this relationship. A sample of participants in a small-scale university study (n=100) provided information through retrospective assessment of adverse childhood experiences. Information through self-report assessment of coping style, Early Maladaptive Schema (EMS), and depressive symptoms was also obtained. Seventy-three percent of the sample reported experiencing at least one of the adversities assessed. Childhood adversity was a predictor of acute symptoms of depression, and general negative affect, indicating that experiencing childhood adversity leads to acute and chronic symptoms of depression in adulthood. Childhood adversity also predicted EMS, and maladaptive coping. There was no statistically significant difference in average reporting of adversity between males and females. The linear combination of childhood adversity subscales, EMS domains, and maladaptive coping styles predicted acute symptoms of anxiety and depression, and general positive and negative affect.

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