Location

Room 144A, Chamberlain Student Center, Rowan University t

Start Date

13-2-2019 11:00 AM

End Date

13-2-2019 12:00 PM

Description

The pressure to succeed and set yourself apart from the rest may seem overwhelming! If you identify as an underrepresented minority (URM) in higher education, the pressure intensifies when you are unable to see yourself, relate and/or identify with your college instructors or campus. Research suggests that identifying as an URM and not having visible representation of yourself in the classroom or on campus can lead to something known as Impostor Phenomenon (IP) also known as Impostor Syndrome. IP is the belief that achievement and success occur not because of performance or ability but rather because of luck. IP negatively impacts students’ college experiences especially their self-esteem, academic honesty, mental health and overall academic success and retention (Parkman, 2016). Research also suggests that first-generation students experience IP at higher levels and more often than other students (Martinez et.al, 2009, Terezini et. al, 1996)

During this session, we will define IP and its predictors, share testimonials and discuss how grit and other strategies for success assisted students and professionals in overcoming impostor phenomenon.

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Feb 13th, 11:00 AM Feb 13th, 12:00 PM

Battling Imposter Syndrome: You Persevered! Luck has no place here

Room 144A, Chamberlain Student Center, Rowan University t

The pressure to succeed and set yourself apart from the rest may seem overwhelming! If you identify as an underrepresented minority (URM) in higher education, the pressure intensifies when you are unable to see yourself, relate and/or identify with your college instructors or campus. Research suggests that identifying as an URM and not having visible representation of yourself in the classroom or on campus can lead to something known as Impostor Phenomenon (IP) also known as Impostor Syndrome. IP is the belief that achievement and success occur not because of performance or ability but rather because of luck. IP negatively impacts students’ college experiences especially their self-esteem, academic honesty, mental health and overall academic success and retention (Parkman, 2016). Research also suggests that first-generation students experience IP at higher levels and more often than other students (Martinez et.al, 2009, Terezini et. al, 1996)

During this session, we will define IP and its predictors, share testimonials and discuss how grit and other strategies for success assisted students and professionals in overcoming impostor phenomenon.