Date of Presentation

5-3-2018 8:00 AM

College

School of Osteopathic Medicine

Poster Abstract

Vitamin D (1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol) is known to be a fat soluble vitamin. We hypothesized that losing weight would thus cause an increase in serum vitamin D levels. To investigate this, a retrospective chart review was performed in which data including sex, age, race, serum Vitamin D levels, body weight and more, of 200 Rowan SOM Family Medicine patients for up to 6 doctor’s office visits each were collected. These data were then analyzed using Microsoft Excel and IBM SPSS. We found while there was a significant positive correlation between weight loss and serum Vitamin D levels, there was not a significant change in weight. We also found that patients that were taking Vitamin D supplements significantly raised their serum Vitamin D levels. This was not affected by any other variables such as sex, age, or race. We will perform further analysis of the data and hope our findings can be used by clinicians assisting patients losing weight.

Keywords

weight loss, vitamin D, dietary supplements

Disciplines

Alternative and Complementary Medicine | Medicine and Health Sciences

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May 3rd, 8:00 AM

Effects of Vitamin D Supplementation

Vitamin D (1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol) is known to be a fat soluble vitamin. We hypothesized that losing weight would thus cause an increase in serum vitamin D levels. To investigate this, a retrospective chart review was performed in which data including sex, age, race, serum Vitamin D levels, body weight and more, of 200 Rowan SOM Family Medicine patients for up to 6 doctor’s office visits each were collected. These data were then analyzed using Microsoft Excel and IBM SPSS. We found while there was a significant positive correlation between weight loss and serum Vitamin D levels, there was not a significant change in weight. We also found that patients that were taking Vitamin D supplements significantly raised their serum Vitamin D levels. This was not affected by any other variables such as sex, age, or race. We will perform further analysis of the data and hope our findings can be used by clinicians assisting patients losing weight.

 

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