Date of Presentation

5-5-2022 12:00 AM

College

School of Osteopathic Medicine

Poster Abstract

Those who suffer a partial thickness ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) tear often undergo a period of nonoperative management including physical therapy rehabilitation. This treatment is aimed at optimizing range of motion (ROM) and strengthening the supporting structures around the elbow to help offload the UCL.

Unfortunately, some of these patients fail nonoperative management and require surgical intervention. This creates a unique set of patients who essentially underwent “prehabilitation” prior to their UCL surgery. Prehabilitation is considered a period of structured physical therapy rehabilitation aimed at strengthening structures surrounding an injured tendon or ligament, to allow for dissipation of stress away from the repaired structure after surgery.

Prehabilitation has been studied extensively and implemented into the clinical practice of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rehabilitation, and is being studied for other injuries as well. However, the efficacy of prehabilitation for UCL surgical patients with partial thickness UCL tears has not been evaluated.

This chart review:

- determines if baseball players with partial UCL tears who completed at least 4 weeks of prehabilitation prior to surgery (Prehab) had better return to play (RTP) rates and quicker return to sport (RTS) time than players who attempted 0-3 weeks of physical therapy prior to UCL surgery (No Prehab)

- compares revision, reoperation, and patient reported outcomes between Prehab and No Prehab players

Keywords

Ulnar Collateral Ligament, Preoperative Exercise, Return to Sport, Surgical Procedures, Baseball, Athletes

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences | Musculoskeletal Diseases | Musculoskeletal System | Orthopedics | Pathological Conditions, Signs and Symptoms | Sports Medicine | Surgical Procedures, Operative | Therapeutics

Document Type

Poster

COinS
 
May 5th, 12:00 AM

Does Prehabilitation Prior to Ulnar Collateral Ligament Surgery Affect Return to Sport Rate or Time in Baseball Players with Partial UCL Tears?

Those who suffer a partial thickness ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) tear often undergo a period of nonoperative management including physical therapy rehabilitation. This treatment is aimed at optimizing range of motion (ROM) and strengthening the supporting structures around the elbow to help offload the UCL.

Unfortunately, some of these patients fail nonoperative management and require surgical intervention. This creates a unique set of patients who essentially underwent “prehabilitation” prior to their UCL surgery. Prehabilitation is considered a period of structured physical therapy rehabilitation aimed at strengthening structures surrounding an injured tendon or ligament, to allow for dissipation of stress away from the repaired structure after surgery.

Prehabilitation has been studied extensively and implemented into the clinical practice of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rehabilitation, and is being studied for other injuries as well. However, the efficacy of prehabilitation for UCL surgical patients with partial thickness UCL tears has not been evaluated.

This chart review:

- determines if baseball players with partial UCL tears who completed at least 4 weeks of prehabilitation prior to surgery (Prehab) had better return to play (RTP) rates and quicker return to sport (RTS) time than players who attempted 0-3 weeks of physical therapy prior to UCL surgery (No Prehab)

- compares revision, reoperation, and patient reported outcomes between Prehab and No Prehab players

 

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