Date Approved

6-16-2004

Embargo Period

4-21-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in Mental Health Counseling and Applied Psychology

Department

Psychology

College

College of Science & Mathematics

First Advisor

Haugh, James A.

Subject(s)

Eating disorders--Etiology

Disciplines

Psychology

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to use a cross-sectional and longitudinal research design to explore the causal relationship between personality, coping, social support and eating disorder pathology. After initial data collection, participants were contacted at either an 8-month or 2-month follow-up period. Of the original 270 participants, 134 subjects completed a follow-up portion of the study (112 at 2-months and 22 at 8-months). Participants completed all measures at time 1, and completed measures of eating disorder pathology at time 2. Results from cross-sectional analyses indicated that neuroticism self-distraction and positive reframing were predictive of eating disorder pathology. Results from longitudinal analyses at 2-month follow up indicated self-distraction and positive reframing were predictive of eating disorder pathology. However, when controlling for time one symptomatology, results indicated that personality, coping, and social support factors were not shown to be statistically significant predictors of eating disorder pathology. Due to limited subject participation at the 8-month follow up, regression analyses could not be completed for this group of participants. Implications for treating and preventing eating disorders are discussed.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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