Date Approved

5-6-2002

Embargo Period

5-12-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in Learning Disabilities

Department

Interdisciplinary and Inclusive Education

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Urban, Stanley

Subject(s)

Learning disabled teenagers; School sports; Self-perception in adolescence

Disciplines

Disability and Equity in Education

Abstract

Research indicates that students in special education have a lower self-concept than their non-disabled peers (Manhattan College, 1998). Manhattan College also states that students with disabilities who play sports have a self-concept equal to or higher than individuals without disabilities. Identifying the degree to which participation in sports may raise the self-concepts of students in special education is an important strategy in educational programming. Discovering techniques to improve the self-concepts of students in special education has been a difficult task for both teachers and parents.

The purpose of this study was to determine if a difference exists between the self-concepts of students in a special education resource room who play sports compared to students in a special education resource room who do not play sports. The data reveals that there are no significant differences between students in a special education resource room who play sports compared to students in a special education resource room who do not play sports.

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