Date Approved

5-1-2002

Embargo Period

5-18-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in School Psychology

Department

Educational Services and Leadership

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Klanderman, John

Subject(s)

School children; Violence on television

Disciplines

Educational Psychology

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of viewing television violence on children. It was hypothesized that children who watch more than 3 to 4 hours of television daily, and who are exposed to inherently violent television programming in which physical and/or verbal confrontations and actions are commonplace, will be more likely than other peers to have received disciplinary referrals.

The study took place within an urban middle school serving children grades 6 through 8. A sample of 52 students was randomly selected, consisting of some students who had and some who had not received disciplinary referrals. A researcher-developed survey was used to collect data. Correlational analysis was used to test the hypothesis.

Findings partially supported the hypothesis: television-watching hours was positively correlated with disciplinary referrals; action and adventure content was not significantly correlated with disciplinary referrals; fighting was not significantly correlated with disciplinary referrals; and there was a significant correlation between the number of disciplinary referrals and the age of subject, with stronger correlations than between referrals and hours of television watching.

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