Date Approved

5-4-1999

Embargo Period

8-8-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in School Psychology

Department

Educational Services and Leadership

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Klanderman, John

Second Advisor

Dihoff, Roberta

Subject(s)

Inclusive education; Teachers--Job stress

Disciplines

Educational Psychology

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not the practice of inclusion had a significant effect on the stress levels of inclusion teachers. Forty-seven elementary school teachers were compared across various teacher demographics. The hypothesis stated that the stress levels of inclusion teachers would be higher than the stress levels of regular education teachers based on the belief that inclusion teachers have a heavier workload. In previous studies, a heavier workload has been shown to be significantly related to higher stress levels. The Occupational Stress Inventory was administered in two schools in Southern New Jersey in January 1999. Scores were statistically analyzed using one way ANOVA's and t tests. Results of this study indicated no significant differences when comparing the stress levels of inclusion teachers and non-inclusion teachers, however significant differences in stress levels were seen when teachers were compared by years of experience, age and level of education.

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