Date Approved

4-27-1999

Embargo Period

8-8-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in School Psychology

Department

Educational Services and Leadership

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Klanderman, John

Second Advisor

Dihoff, Roberta

Subject(s)

Parenting--Study and teaching; Self-esteem

Disciplines

Educational Psychology

Abstract

Similar to studies by Gordon and others, the purpose of this study was to retest and reinvestigate whether parent training increased the self-esteem of participants. Two groups (sample (n = 15) and control (n = 10)) were pre- and posttested (at 10 and 9 weeks respectively), using the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale: 2. Both groups showed high educational achievement and were Caucasian/White; the sample was 13 women, 2 men, while the control was 9 men and 1 woman; and, most reported above average incomes. The scores were analyzed using a repeated measures t test and non-parametric analysis, which did not find training to increase self-esteem, but showed a tendency to reduce CON (conflict). All of the sub scores from the TSCS:2 were found to be significantly correlated, and IDN (identity) appeared to be most significant. The conclusions were that one instrument is not sufficient to determine if training increases self-esteem and longitudinal studies may be of interest to future researchers.

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