Date Approved

8-24-2016

Embargo Period

8-25-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. School Psychology

Department

Psychology

College

College of Science & Mathematics

First Advisor

Dihoff, Roberta

Second Advisor

Allen, Terri

Subject(s)

College students with disabilities; Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in adolescence

Disciplines

School Psychology

Abstract

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood. There is a great deal of published literature that supports the effect of interventions for students at the elementary and secondary levels, however there is limited research that analyzes interventions for college students with ADHD. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of extended time accommodations for college students with and without ADHD. It was hypothesized that students with ADHD would perform better when given extended time to complete assignments. A mixed ANOVA used to investigate the differences in test scores of those with and without a self-diagnosis of ADHD under separate testing conditions was found to be non-significant. Future studies involving a sufficient number of participants with a more accurate diagnosis of ADHD are expected to lead to more effective accommodations for students living with ADHD.

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