Date Approved

4-29-1996

Embargo Period

9-7-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in Special Education

Department

Interdisciplinary and Inclusive Education

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Kuder, S. Jay

Subject(s)

Children with mental disabilities--Behavior modification; Self-management (Psychology)

Disciplines

Special Education and Teaching

Abstract

Can the use of self-management techniques be effective in reducing the off-task behaviors of multiply handicapped students? For the purposes of this study, multiply handicapped students were defined as mentally retarded and the method of self-management used was self-recording. Three students out of a class of ten were chosen based on a teacher rating scale. The lowest averaged scores determined which students were off-task the most. In addition, a multiple baseline design measured the occurrence and non-occurrence of nine target behaviors, three per student.

The results showed self-recording to be an effective intervention in eight out of the nine targeted behaviors(89%).

Despite the students' low levels of cognitive functioning, all of the students learned to self-record specific behaviors with an accuracy rating ranging from 72-95%. Therefore, self-recording may be a viable option to reduce the off-task behaviors of mentally retarded students.

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