Date Approved

4-15-1995

Embargo Period

9-11-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in School Psychology

Department

Educational Services and Leadership

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Klanderman, John

Subject(s)

Intrinsic motivation; Learning disabled children--Education; Third grade (Education)

Disciplines

Educational Psychology

Abstract

The question of what motivates a child to learn has been an important interest to educators, psychologists, and parents as well. Within the domain of motivation, "intrinsic motivation" is an area that holds promise to students with learning problems. The purpose of this study is to see whether students with learning problems are less intrinsically motivated than their non-handicapped peers.

There are two groups of subjects: 30 third grade students in self-contained classrooms and 30 third grade students in regular classrooms. Each subject was given the "Scale of Intrinsic Versus Extrinsic Orientation in the Classroom." Statistical procedures were used to determine whether a difference exists between students with learning problems and students without learning problems. It was found that the students in the self-contained classrooms scored lower than the students in the regular classrooms.

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