Date Approved

6-22-1995

Embargo Period

9-13-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.S. in Teaching

Department

Interdisciplinary and Inclusive Education

College

College of Education

First Advisor

Robinson, Randall S.

Subject(s)

Sex differences (Psychology); Sex role--United States; Sexual division of labor; Vocational guidance

Disciplines

Elementary Education and Teaching

Abstract

This study was designed to determine if students in a suburban, southern New Jersey elementary school would have gender-biased attitudes concerning appropriate roles and career aspirations for males and females.

A questionnaire was administered to a sample of 100 students from a total population of 74 fourth grade students and 58 fifth grade students from one school in a southern New Jersey suburban school district. Items on the questionnaire included a list of occupations as well as questions regarding gender and careers.

The hypothesis was not supported because it was found that most of the students did not possess a gender-biased attitude. Of the 100 students who participated in the study, 65 achieved a score of 46 or below, indicating non-biased attitudes of careers and gender. Thirty-five students achieved a score of 48 or above, which indicated a biased attitude. Additionally, the second hypothesis was supported in part and unsupported in part. The ratios of biased girls to non-biased girls and of biased boys to non-biased boys were about equal at 2:3 for each. However, it was found that the girls and boys were equally unbiased, rather than biased as the hypothesis predicted.

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