Author(s)

Christina Carter

Date Approved

6-11-2015

Embargo Period

6-11-2017

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. Clinical Mental Health Counseling

Department

Psychology

College

College of Science & Mathematics

First Advisor

Dinzeo, Tom

Subject(s)

Creative ability;Mental illness

Disciplines

Psychiatric and Mental Health

Abstract

The current study explored how the symptom severity of the affective and schizophrenia spectrums related to performance on a divergent thinking task and self-reports of creative achievement, as well as the contribution of cognitive inhibition as a moderating factor between these variables. 98 participants completed a 1.5 hour battery of tests that combined measures between this study and another study. Measures pertaining to this study included self-report measures of schizotypy and hypomania, a divergent thinking creativity task, a computerized stimuli-response task, and two self-reports of creative achievement. Correlations were conducted to examine linear relationships, nonlinear regression models were conducted to consider the presence of an inverted U-shaped relationship between mental illness and creativity, and hierarchical regression models were conducted to examine the potential of cognitive inhibition as a moderating factor. Results indicated mixed relationships between psychopathology and creativity with some significance between positive schizotypy and creativity, and the moderation of cognitive inhibition with hypomania.

Share

COinS