Author(s)

Taylor Wiltsee

Date Approved

2-24-2015

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. Clinical Mental Health Counseling

Department

Psychology

College

College of Science & Mathematics

First Advisor

Haugh, Jim

Subject(s)

Depression, Mental;Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy

Disciplines

Psychiatric and Mental Health

Abstract

The present study will examine the relationships between rumination, social problem-solving, mindfulness, and depressive symptomology. These relationships will be evaluated by means of Pearson correlations, and the testing of the proposed path model using AMOS. In order to test our hypotheses, undergraduate students were asked to complete a battery of self-report measures to quantify ruminative tendencies, problem-solving ability, mindfulness skills, and depressive symptom severity and were given course credit for participation. Results indicate that hypotheses were partially supported. Bivariate correlations yielded statistically significant relationships between each of the constructs, with rumination positively associated with depressive symptoms, and negatively associated with social problem-solving and mindfulness. While higher social problem-solving scores were found to be associated with lower rumination and depressive symptoms, and were more likely to possess increased mindfulness ability. Analyses of the path model indicated that rumination and social problem-solving were predictive of depressive symptomology, while the mindfulness path was not found to be predictive of depressive symptoms. Chi-square goodness-of-fit analyses were significant, indicating that the hypothesized model is not an adequate fit for the data.

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