Author(s)

Julian Affrime

Date Approved

9-16-2011

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. Applied Psychology and Professional Mental Health Counseling

Department

Psychology

College

College of Science & Mathematics

First Advisor

Miller, Matthew

Subject(s)

Happiness;Religion

Disciplines

Psychiatric and Mental Health

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between religious worldview and multiple measures of subjective well-being, including: the Unconditional Self-Acceptance Questionnaire (Chamberlain & Haaga, 2001a), the Orientations to Happiness Questionnaire (Peterson, Park, & Seligman, 2005), the Subjective Happiness Scale (Lyubomirsky & Lepper, 1999), the Purpose in Life Test (Crumbaugh & Maholick, 1964), and the Satisfaction with Life Scale (Diener, et al., 1985) among a sample of 272 college students. Participants were divided into six worldviews (Monotheism, Polytheism, Eastern Pantheism, Modern Humanism, Empiricism, and Naturalism) based on the factorial analysis computed by Spearman, the developer of the Personal Philosophical Belief Statements Scale (2006). The data suggest that one's worldview may have a significant relationship with their pursuit of happiness through a meaningful life and/or seeing purpose in one's life, but failed to reveal additional differences between worldviews across the other measures of happiness or satisfaction.

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