Date Approved

10-16-2018

Embargo Period

10-22-2018

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

MA Clinical Psychology

Department

Psychology

College

College of Science & Mathematics

First Advisor

Libon, David J.

Second Advisor

Frierson, Georita

Third Advisor

Angelone, Bonnie

Keywords

Clinical psychology, Cognitive Decline, Episodic Memory, Mild Cognitive Impairment

Subject(s)

Mild cognitive impairment

Disciplines

Clinical Psychology | Cognitive Psychology

Abstract

Objective: To compare verbal versus visual serial list learning test performance in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and assess relationships between serial list learning and hippocampal volume. Methods: Patients were diagnosed with non-MCI, amnestic MCI (aMCI), and combined mixed/dysexecutive MCI (mixed/dysMCI). Outcome measures included immediate/delay free recall, and delay recognition performance from the 12-word Philadelphia Verbal Learning Test (PrVLT) and the Brief Visuospatial Memory Test-Revised (BVMT-R). Lateral hippocampal volumes were obtained. Results: Non-MCI patients scored better than other groups on P(r)VLT immediate/delay free recall. aMCI patients scored lower than other groups on P(r)VLT delay recognition. Non-MCI patients were superior to MCI groups on all BVMT-R parameters. All groups scored lower on BVMT-R compared to analogous P(r)VLT parameters. Better P(r)VLT immediate/delay free recall was associated with greater left hippocampal volume. BVMT-R 2-point, full credit responses were associated with greater right hippocampal volume; memory for object location was associated with left hippocampal volume. Conclusions: Both serial list learning tests identify memory impairment. The association for the BVMT-R and bilateral hippocampal volume suggests a wider neurocognitive network may be recruited for visual serial list learning. These data suggest that visual serial list learning may be particularly sensitive to emergent cognitive impairment.

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