Date Approved

8-13-2020

Embargo Period

8-14-2020

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

PhD Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Psychology

College

College of Science & Mathematics

First Advisor

DiHoff, Roberta

Second Advisor

Abrams, Lisa

Third Advisor

Dinzeo, Thomas

Keywords

Coping, Correlates, Mental Health, Non-Suicidal Self-Injury, Physical Health, Self Injurious Behavior

Subject(s)

Adjustment (Psychology); Self-mutilation

Disciplines

Clinical Psychology

Abstract

Coping skills can be used in a myriad of situations, as these alleviate unwanted feelings. While negative coping skills might be effective in the short term, their long term effects are not beneficial. Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), a type of negative coping mechanism, has been shown to be reported by college students most when compared to adults and young adults. The independent relationships between coping strategy, physical health, and NSSI have been previously established. There is a paucity of literature assessing NSSI while considering the pre-existing relationship between physical and mental health. As such, this study examines the moderating function of physical health on the relationship between coping strategy and NSSI engagement. Undergraduate students (n=209) completed a self-report questionnaire. Three hierarchical logistic regressions yielded non-significant results. Physical health does not significantly moderate the relationship between coping strategy and NSSI engagement. The results can be helpful in identifying additional correlates and at risk individuals and/or populations.

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