Date Approved

8-27-2020

Embargo Period

8-28-2022

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

EdD Doctor of Education

Department

Educational Services and Leadership

College

College of Education

Advisor

Thompson, Carol C.

Committee Member 1

Galbiati, Jacqueline

Committee Member 2

Price, Patricia

Keywords

Attrition Rates, Barriers, Education, Foreign-born, Male, Nursing Students

Subject(s)

Nursing students, Foreign; Male nurses

Disciplines

Gender Equity in Education | Health and Physical Education | Higher Education

Abstract

The United States has a 36% shortage of full-time nurses. This is projected to worsen. There will be a need for 260, 000 more nurses by 2025 and more than 581,000 new nursing positions will be created through 2024 (American Association College of Nursing, 2011; U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2015). By 2030, New Jersey's shortage of nurses will exceed 43% (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2017). If a diverse population of students complete a nursing program and become nurses working in the field, the literature reports that there are better client outcomes when the healthcare industry mirrors the population that is being served (Kanchana & Sangamesh, 2016; NACNEP, 2013; NRC, 2004). This qualitative study gave insight into barriers that may impede foreign-born and educated male students' success in United States nursing programs. These students' prior pedagogical experiences, lack of social and family support, and stress appeared to play a significant role in their success while completing course work in a nursing program.

Available for download on Sunday, August 28, 2022

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