Date of Presentation

5-6-2021 12:00 AM

College

School of Osteopathic Medicine

Poster Abstract

Background

• Nationally declining cervical cancer rates are still high amongst minority women in NJ, with Hispanic women being affected the most.

• The Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection and can lead to cervical cancer

• Administration of the 9-valent HPV vaccine can prevent infection and progression to cancer

• Regular cervical cancer screenings allow for better outcomes

• Various barriers prevent people with a cervix receiving the vaccine

• Various barriers prevent people with a cervix aged >/= 30 from receiving regular cervical cancer screenings

Conclusions

  • Improved physician recommendation is required for the HPV vaccine and HPV testing

• Improved outreach to high-risk populations is required

• Education on programs such as NJCEED and the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program provide free screenings for low income and/or uninsured individuals

• Education on free vaccine programs

Keywords

cervical cancer, Hispanic, HPV, human papilloma virus, screening

Disciplines

Community Health and Preventive Medicine | Female Urogenital Diseases and Pregnancy Complications | Medicine and Health Sciences | Neoplasms | Obstetrics and Gynecology | Oncology

Document Type

Poster

COinS
 
May 6th, 12:00 AM

Assessment of Factors Preventing Adequate Decline in Cervical Cancer Rates Amongst Minority Women in New Jersey

Background

• Nationally declining cervical cancer rates are still high amongst minority women in NJ, with Hispanic women being affected the most.

• The Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection and can lead to cervical cancer

• Administration of the 9-valent HPV vaccine can prevent infection and progression to cancer

• Regular cervical cancer screenings allow for better outcomes

• Various barriers prevent people with a cervix receiving the vaccine

• Various barriers prevent people with a cervix aged >/= 30 from receiving regular cervical cancer screenings

Conclusions

  • Improved physician recommendation is required for the HPV vaccine and HPV testing

• Improved outreach to high-risk populations is required

• Education on programs such as NJCEED and the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program provide free screenings for low income and/or uninsured individuals

• Education on free vaccine programs

 

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